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Put this page together quickly based on a request. It is a very cursory (no pun intended) treatment of keyboarding software. We can make it better.  If you have reviews (positive, negative, whatever) of any of the above, or any new software, or teaching techniques, lesson plans, etc. related to this topic, please share them with Jim Allan. I will post them to this page, so all teachers can benefit from your experience.

  • VI Technology Resource Guide Keyboarding Skills - excellent source for skills list and strategies
  • Search Closing the Gap Resource Directory - search for "keyboarding" to see a list of available keyboarding software. Includes short review, product description, and manufacturer contact information.
  • About One Hand Typing and Keyboarding - Resources, Instructions and Motivation
  • APH Talking Typing Tutor, which is self voicing using a sound card.
  • Talking Typing Teacher - built-in speech
  • All The Right Type 3.0 - good for low vision students. Font size can be increased for reading ease. Mouse review game: gives students the control and dexterity needed for mouse skills. Numeric keypad lesson.
  • SuperKids Software Review of Typing Software - good overview of keyboarding software.
  • Ultrakey: SuperKids Software Review of UltraKey.
  • Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing: SuperKids Software Review of Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing Version 5.
  • Mario Teaches Typing: SuperKids Software Review of Mario Teaches Typing 2.
  • All the right type:  Ingenuity Works Inc. - All the Right Type
  • Type to Learn:
    •  SuperKids Software Review of Type to Learn.
      comments from vision teachers (from AERNET)
      From Carla Wirzburger
      This program comes on disk and CD in both MAC and PC formats. It has  large print options and I've used it very successfully with low vision students of various abilities and ages. I've also had a couple of paraprofessionals learn to type along with my students. It is a little unusual in that it does not teach the home-row keys first. I find this is great for kids who might have trouble remembering the whole home-row as taught in traditional programs or kids who might have more difficulties learning to coordinate their ring and little fingers. However, if I'm working with a student with good motor-memory and coordination, I prefer a more traditional home-row approach.
      From PBJGal
      It's a very good program. Although I do not believe that it was designed with only visually impaired people in mind, it has some very good qualities. The contrast is good; there is some speech; there is not a lot of visual clutter and there are a variety of lessons and games available. It works well with Close View - a screen enlargement program on the Mac.
      From Pam Zipperer
      If your student has low vision, Sunburst Company has a great program called "Type to Learn."  I have used it with students as young as four years old.  You can set all types of parameters as far as mastery, words per minute, etc.  It's the best keyboarding program I have found.  I would work for about 15 minutes with my student making sure he was using the correct finger placement, etc; after a few years, he was able to work independently.  We just kept increasing the number of words per minute he needed to type, before he could move to the next level.  toll free number is 800-321-7511.
  • Infogrip, Inc. - One-handed, other keyboards, and alternative input devices.
  • Keyboarding For Kids
    Teach your child in 10 easy fun lessons by Barbara Aliaga
    SELF-COUNSEL SERIES
    International Self-Counsel Press Ltd.
    Editorial Office
    306 West 25th Street
    North Vancouver, BC V7N 2G1
    CANADA

If you have reviews (positive, negative, whatever) of any of the above, or any new software, or teaching techniques, lesson plans, etc. related to this topic, please share them with Jim Allan. I will post them to this page, so all teachers can benefit from your experience.